Category Archives: inequality

Pesticide Drift and the Politics of Scale

“California’s Central Valley is a bread basket of America. It is the source of much of the country’s grapes, tree fruit, nuts, and vegetables. Many of the farms are massive, requiring large amounts of capital, land, and labor.

In the nearby small towns are the homes of the state’s farm laborers. They are primarily Latino. About half are undocumented. Most are poor and few have health care. Politically and economically weak, they are the primary human victims of pesticide drift.”

via Pesticide Drift and the Politics of Scale » Sociological Images.

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As Riots Follow Freddie Gray’s Death in Baltimore, Calls for Calm Ring Hollow

“When nonviolence is preached as an attempt to evade the repercussions of political brutality, it betrays itself. When nonviolence begins halfway through the war with the aggressor calling time out, it exposes itself as a ruse.”

via As Riots Follow Freddie Gray’s Death in Baltimore, Calls for Calm Ring Hollow – The Atlantic.

Children, Chores, and the Gender Pay Gap at Home

“Girls do more chores than boys and are less likely to get an allowance in exchange for their work. When they do, they are paid less.”

via Children, Chores, and the Gender Pay Gap at Home » Sociological Images.

Friendship 9 Convictions Overturned by South Carolina Judge

“Fifty-four years ago this week, nine young black men sat down at the whites-only counter of McCrory’s five-and-dime store on Main Street in the town of Rock Hill, South Carolina. After ordering burgers and cokes, the men were asked to leave; after they refused to leave, they were arrested for trespassing.”

via Friendship 9 Convictions Overturned by South Carolina Judge – The Atlantic.

Are Tiny-House Villages The Solution To Homelessness?

“In the Pacific Northwest, people with nowhere else to go are forming micro-communities with communal kitchens and toilets but teeny, individual sleeping units. Could tiny homes, once the provenance of design blogs, help curb homelessness nationwide?” via Are Tiny-House Villages The Solution To Homelessness – BuzzFeed News.

I taught my black kids that their elite upbringing would protect them from discrimination. I was wrong.

“And that was the goal we had in mind as my wife and I raised our kids. We both had careers in white firms that represented the best in law, banking and consulting; we attended schools and shared dorm rooms with white friends and had strong ties to our community including my service, for the last 12 years, as chairman of the county police board. I was certain that my Princeton and Harvard Law degrees and economic privilege not only would empower me to navigate the mostly white neighborhoods and institutions that my kids inhabited, but would provide a cocoon to protect them from the bias I had encountered growing up. My wife and I used our knowledge of white upper-class life to envelop our sons and daughter in a social armor that we felt would repel discriminatory attacks. We outfitted them in uniforms that we hoped would help them escape profiling in stores and public areas: pastel-colored, non-hooded sweatshirts; cleanly pressed, belted, non-baggy khaki pants; tightly-laced white tennis sneakers; Top-Sider shoes; conservative blazers; rep ties; closely cropped hair; and no sunglasses. Never any sunglasses.”

via I taught my black kids that their elite upbringing would protect them from discrimination. I was wrong. – The Washington Post.

How White People Got Made

“The Virginians legislated a new class of people into existence: the whites. They gave the whites certain rights, and took other rights from blacks. White, as a language of race, appears in Virginia around the 1680s, and seems to first appear in Virginia law in 1691. And thus whiteness, and to a degree as well blackness, was born in the mind of America.”

via How White People Got Made — The Message — Medium.

The Old Jim Crow

“To criminalize black people for reading, walking, worshipping—things whites do all the time—is to essentially criminalize black humanity. And this not just a matter of enslaved black people. States like Illinois and Oregon passed laws barring all black people from entering their borders. Among those criminalized by these laws was a black man who brought his fiancée to Illinois in hopes of marrying her. He was prosecuted and convicted, and in upholding his conviction the Illinois Supreme Court declared its intent “to exclude any further ingress of negroes, and to remove those already among us as speedily as possible.”

via The Old Jim Crow – The Atlantic.